Imagine your place on the bookshelf of the future

This month’s task is about grammar and how you choose to use it. To begin, start a free-write on the topic of your choosing – but write even more loosely than usual – free associate, switch between multiple viewpoints, play with form and language.

Now you are going to edit two versions of the same piece. In the first, use the rules of grammar to make sense of your freewheeling prose. In the second, corrupt the conventions even further – imagine grammar as a cage from which you are trying to escape. Then compare your pieces and the feelings you evoked. Which would you most like to keep writing?

 Sarah Winman, author of When God Was a Rabbit and Tin Man

  Emma Darwin, author of Get Started in Writing Historical Fiction

Adam Roberts, author of Get Started in Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy

This month’s task is about grammar and how you choose to use it. To begin, start a free-write on the topic of your choosing – but write even more loosely than usual – free associate, switch between multiple viewpoints, play with form and language.

Now you are going to edit two versions of the same piece. In the first, use the rules of grammar to make sense of your freewheeling prose. In the second, corrupt the conventions even further – imagine grammar as a cage from which you are trying to escape. Then compare your pieces and the feelings you evoked. Which would you most like to keep writing?

Zoë Fairbairns, author of Write Short Stories and Get Them Published

Vaseem Khan, author of The Unexpected Inheritance of Inspector Chopra

 Juno Dawson, author of dark teen thrillers, and non-fiction including Being a Boy and This Book is Gay